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Month: February 2017

Using IP Helpers with the DHCP and PXE Boot Process

Using IP Helpers with the DHCP and PXE Boot Process

Following on from the interest in my DHCP and PXE Boot Process Explained blog post a few weeks ago I thought it might be useful to give an example of how DHCP works in a real world example where we have multiple subnets, routers and remote offices. Real World Example An example of what we have in the real world could be the following: This set up has the DHCP server and SCCM server within a subnet and the clients…

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ConfigMgr Query for Name, Serial Number, Bios Version, IP Address and MAC Address

ConfigMgr Query for Name, Serial Number, Bios Version, IP Address and MAC Address

I recently had to pull together some information on several servers and I made used of ConfigMgr in order to collate the information.  Below is the ConfigMgr Query that I used and also it’s SQL equivalent. Below is the ConfigMgr Query that will pull out the Computer Name, Serial Number, BIOS Version, IP and MAC Address. When you look at your query statement window, it should look like this.     Here is the SQL equivalent if you wish to use…

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DHCP and the PXE Boot Process Explained

DHCP and the PXE Boot Process Explained

Recently I came across a scenario where we had to troubleshoot why a laptop wasn’t rebuilding via SCCM and I thought it would be good to write an article explaining the PXE boot process and how DHCP is linked to that. Basic DHCP Process The simplest of DHCP processes goes as follows: The client connects to the network and sends out a DHCP broadcast The DHCP server picks up the broadcast The server then replies with a suggested IP address…

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How To Configure DHCP Using Powershell

How To Configure DHCP Using Powershell

I have complied some notes on how to install and configure DHCP using Powershell cmdlets.  These can come in handy for setting up lab environments quickly or scripting changes within your environment easily. The first cmdlet is how to install the necessary role: Once the DHCP role has been created you can start to configure scopes and various options needed for that scope. The cmdlet below creates a scope with the range 10.10.54.3-254, it sets the subnet to 255.255.255.0. And…

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Blogger Recommendations

Blogger Recommendations

Not only do a enjoy blogging about things that I come across during my working life I enjoy reading other IT professionals blogs where I can learn new skills/tips or find out about the latest news within the IT industry.  Below are a list of some of the blogs I have been reading this month and recommend that you check them out also: Harjit Dhaliwal is a Microsoft MVP who focuses on Microsoft technologies such as ConfigMgr, SCOM, Windows Server…

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Enable Telnet with Powershell

Enable Telnet with Powershell

Every now and again you need to troubleshoot firewall rules and Telnet is a great tool to help understand if a port is open or not between two devices.  However Telnet is not enabled by default anymore, it has been like that since Windows Server 2008. The following Powershell commands will help you to quickly enable it: Installing the Telnet client doesn’t require a reboot.   The client can also be removed easily via Powershell with these commands: Please follow…

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Configure non-integrated DNS zones with Powershell

Configure non-integrated DNS zones with Powershell

I’ve been looking at scripting out the build out of my Azure Lab so I can build it, use it for a purpose then rip it down and start again to use it again.  One of the scripts that I’ve pulled together is configuring non-integrated DNS Zones with Powershell both on a local server and a remote server. The script I’ve created assumes that the DNS role is installed on your servers and that PSRemoting is enabled on your servers. …

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How to Run PowerShell Commands on Remote Computers

How to Run PowerShell Commands on Remote Computers

Powershell Remoting can allow you to run individual commands or run full Powershell sessions on remote systems.  Unfortunately by default it is locked down, so before you try to use it you need to enable it.  Within a domain this is an easy process. On the computer you wish to remote to open up a Powershell command as Administrator. Run the following cmdlet:   This command will start the WinRM service and sets it to automatic, it also creates a…

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